Some political parties oppose granting the right to women over concerns it would disrupt the country’s sectarian makeup.

Activists gathered in Downtown Beirut to protest Lebanon’s nationality law that, like Jordan’s, currently prevents women from passing their citizenship to their family members. According to Lebanese law, Lebanese women with a non-Lebanese spouse cannot pass their citizenship onto their husbands or their children, depriving them of health and employment entitlements that are restricted to citizens. In January 2013, campaigners proposed a draft law that would enable women to pass on their nationality, but it was later rejected by the country’s parliament. Some political parties oppose granting the right to women over concerns it would disrupt the country’s sectarian makeup. They also argue that doing so could lead to indirectly settling Palestinian refugees, which total around 400,000 in the country. Why it would be permissible for a Lebanese (or Jordanian) man to marry a non-national, and pass on the citizenship, without unbalancing the status-quo seems to disrupt the “logic” somewhat.

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